C. Kellner in Wetzlar, Belthle & Rexroth, No. 451, c. 1861

Large Model Microscope

(Grosses Mikroskop)

 

C. Kellner in Wetzlar, Belthle & Rexroth, No. 451, c. 1861 C. Kellner in Wetzlar, Belthle & Rexroth, No. 451, c. 1861 C. Kellner in Wetzlar, Belthle & Rexroth, No. 451, c. 1861

 

C. Kellner in Wetzlar, Belthle & Rexroth, No. 451, c. 1861 C. Kellner in Wetzlar, Belthle & Rexroth, No. 451, c. 1861. Substage

C. Kellner in Wetzlar, Belthle & Rexroth, No. 451, c. 1861. Stored in the wood case.

C. Kellner in Wetzlar, Belthle & Rexroth, No. 451, c. 1861. Accessories

polarizing accessories

mounting of the polarizer

sub-stage fitting

The microscope is cased with a number of accessories that include three eyepieces numbered I-III and five objectives numbered 0, 1, 7, and two 3's. The 0, 1, and one of the 3 objectives are signed "Belthle & Rexroth". One number 3 objective is now defective (its front element is now mounted backwards!) and it was presumably replaced by the original owner with another number 3 signed "Belthle". The number 7 objective is unsigned but is engraved with the number "1337"; this lens appears to be a later addition although it has the same non-standard thread as the other objectives. Also included is a substage Nicol prism that mounts onto a dovetail slot located on the mirror arm and an analyzing prism that mounts within the body tube by screwing into the back of the nosepiece.

The rectangular stage has an oxidized brass finish and there are no provisions for stage clips. Inset under the stage is a wheel with five apertures. An accessory substage apparatus slides into a dovetailed fitting under the stage. This apparatus holds an aperture stop which can be moved up or down relative to the specimen by means of a lever.

C. Kellner in Wetzlar, Belthle & Rexroth, No. 451, c. 1861

This is an example of the largest size model produced by the firm; See: C. Kellner in Wetzlar gegründeten Instituts Nachfolger: Belthle and Rexroth Price list for 1862 . Unfortunately, the production archives retained by Leica Microsystems GmbH of microscopes made in the early period of the Optical Institute in Wetzlar do not have an entry for this microscope and therefore the original purchaser will remain unknown. It was purchased for this collection in the USA. Another example of this model with serial No. 452 was also purchased in the USA. This one lacks the accessory substage apparatus.

In 1849, Carl Kellner founded what was named the Optical Institute in Wetzlar Germany. By 1851 he employed twelve workmen and was producing his first microscopes. Kellner's microscopes met with wide acclaim and were furnished with his noted invention, the orthoscopic eyepiece. Unfortunately, at only the age of twenty nine, Kellner succumbed to tuberculosis in 1855. The Optical Institute survived under the leadership of Friedrich Belthle, an apprentice of Kellner's, who married Kellner's widow shortly after his death. Beginning in 1857 there was, for a brief time, a partnership between Belthle and H. Rexroth. In 1863, Ernst Leitz joined the Institute. By 1865 he was a partner in the firm, and later became the sole proprietor after Belthle's death in 1869.


For more information about this microscope, related instruments, and the history of the Leitz firm see the article: Some Early Microscopes from the Optical Institute in Wetzlar


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