J. Swift, Optician, 128 City Road, London E. C.

Binocular microscope for conventional and polarized light microscopy, c. 1978

J. Swift, Optician, 128 City Road, London E. C.. Binocular microscope for conventional and polarized light microscopy. c. 1870
J. Swift, Optician, 128 City Road, London E. C.. Binocular microscope for conventional and polarized light microscopy. c. 1870
J. Swift, Optician, 128 City Road, London E. C.. Binocular microscope for conventional and polarized light microscopy. c. 1870
J. Swift, Optician, 128 City Road, London E. C.. Binocular microscope for conventional and polarized light microscopy. c. 1870
accessories

The five objectives supplied with this microscope were all made by Henry Crouch, London.

microscope in case
case
prisms
substage

James Powell Swift learned his trade while working with Andrew Ross. In 1854, he set up his own workshop at 15 Kingsland Road, London. In 1870, he change his location to 128 City Road. The dating of this microscope relies of the fact that he was located at City Road only for a few years, 1870-1872. He was thereafter located at 43 University St. and by 1877, the firm was known as James Swift & Son.

This binocular microscope was specially designed for both conventional and polarized light microscopy. The nosepiece has a Nicol prism mounted above the Wenham prism with each residing in a sliding brass box so that they can be introduced or removed from the light path. This arrangement can allow for simultaneous use of both prisms thereby resulting in a stereoscopic image using polarized light.

From the Swift catalog: "Swift's Adaptation of the Analysing Prism to the Binocular Microscope. The advantages of this adaptation, are effectual illumination in both bodies, and (the analyser being placed above the binocular prism) the transmission of a greater amount of light, and less distortion consequent upon the lessening of the distance between the objective and binocular prism"

A specialize achromatic substage condenser, described below, was designed for this microscope.

Extracted from: English Mechanic and Mirror of Science, Vol. 11, 1870 :

Swift achromatic condenser

A short time since Mr. James Swift, of the City Road, presented to the Royal Microscopical Society an achromatic condenser he had just completed, which has the advantage of containing more accessories than any other piece of apparatus, as Figs. 8 and 9 will show:

A, optical combination.

B, rack adjustment for focussing.

C, sliding frame with parts for dark ground illumination.

D, large diaphragm.

E, rotating cap to carry test stops.

F, small diaphragm of apertures.

G, polarizing prism.

H, selenite diaphragm.

I, oblique light shutter.

Swift binoculat microscope

 

An 1870 advertisement

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