Powell & Lealand, London

Student microscope with Varley stage, c. 1850

 Powell & Lealand, London. Student microscope with Varley stage, c. 1850  Powell & Lealand, London. Student microscope with Varley stage, c. 1850
 Powell & Lealand, London. Student microscope with Varley stage, c. 1850  Powell & Lealand, London. Student microscope with Varley stage, c. 1850
 Powell & Lealand, London. Student microscope with Varley stage, c. 1850
Powell & Lealand London

The Powell & Lealand Student microscope, introduced in 1840, generally was constructed without a fine adjustment and with a painted iron base and limb. In fact, it is often called the "Iron Microscope" because of the use of this metal in its construction; see this example. The present example is exceptional given that it has a nosepiece fine adjustment and is constructed entirely in brass. It also incorporates a Varley type mechanical stage having the lever control below the stage.

 

Powell and Lealand Iron Microscope

The Powell & Lealand Iron Microscope


The firm began with the partnership established between Peter Lealand & Hugh Powell in 1841. Previous to that, Hugh Powell produced microscopes under his own name and for the trade. At different times, they were located at various addresses in London: 24 Clarendon St., Somers town 1841-1846, 4 Seymour Place, Euston Sq., New Rd. 1847-1857, and 170 Euston Rd. 1857-1905. The business was operated by Thomas Powell, son of the founder, after his father's death in 1883. The firm ceased the manufacture of microscopes in 1901 although some models continued to be made by the firm's former foreman, Charles Perry, under the guidance of Thomas Powell with the work being done in the factory of Charles Baker. This continued up to 1914.

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