L. Schrauer, Maker, New York

Large continental style microscope, c. 1880

L. Schrauer, Maker, New York. Large continental style microscope, c. 1880

L. Schrauer, Maker, New York. Large continental style microscope, c. 1880

L. Schrauer, Maker, New York. Large continental style microscope, c. 1880

L. Schrauer, Maker, New York. Large continental style microscope, c. 1880

The tube length can be extended using the draw-tube.

 

L. Schrauer, Maker, New York. Large continental style microscope, c. 1880. Accessories

Accessories include two eyepieces, three objectives with the brass canisters signed Hartnack & Prazmoswski and numbered 2, 4, and 7, an Abbe condenser with side-in aperture stop, a double objective changer, and a brass and glass slide carrier. Schrauer never made his own objectives and supplied his microscopes with objective made by other firms, both American and European. The objective changer incorporates adapters that allow the use of objectives with the Hartnack female thread; these can be screwed off, which then allows the use of lenses having the RMS thread. The wood storage case for this microscope is a replacement.

L. Schrauer, Maker, New York. L. Schrauer, Maker, New York. Large continental style microscope, c. 1880

The mirror is mounted on a swinging arm attached to a disk calibrated in degrees. The mirror can be positioned above the stage to illuminate opaque objects. The Abbe condenser is housed in a focusing mount, which is pinned into place at the underside of the stage, thus allowing it to be quickly removed or attached. In addition, there is an aperture wheel with 5 apertures inset into the stage surface.

Although this microscope resembles the continental style microscopes that were prevalent at the time, the fine adjustment mechanism on this instrument is atypical of that usually associated with the continental form. In contrast to a conventional continental microscope, this microscope utilizes a lever mechanism, which only moves the tube with the limb being held stationary. The microscope is signed on the base as above. Leopold Schrauer first began the manufacture of microscopes in Boston. By 1877, he was located in New York City at various addresses. Schrauer microscopes are relatively uncommon. In the book entitled A Short History of the Early American Microscopes by D. Pagitt, it is stated "It is somewhat strange that Schrauer's microscopes are not more common today, since he was apparently in business for more than 20 years. This may be partially explained by Schrauer's proclamation that he gave no discount to the trade which would indicate that he did not have access to the traditional marketing agencies".

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