Seibert in Wetzlar

Polarizing (Mineral) Microscope, c. 1895

(mittleres Polarisationsmikroskop)

Seibert in Wetzlar. Polarizing (Mineral) Microscope, c. 1895

Seibert in Wetzlar. Polarizing (Mineral) Microscope, c. 1895

Seibert in Wetzlar. Polarizing (Mineral) Microscope, c. 1895

Seibert in Wetzlar. Polarizing (Mineral) Microscope, c. 1895

Seibert microscope eyepiece analyzer

    Seibert in Wetzlar. Polarizing (Mineral) Microscope, c. 1895

 

Seibert in Wetzlar. Polarizing (Mineral) Microscope, c. 1895. sub-stage

Seibert in Wetzlar. Polarizing (Mineral) Microscope, c. 1895. Stage

Seibert in Wetzlar. Polarizing (Mineral) Microscope, c. 1895.In storage case.

Seibert in Wetzlar. Polarizing (Mineral) Microscope, c. 1895. Storage case

This microscope is signed on the tube Seibert in Wetzlar. There is no serial number either on the microscope or on the storage case. The serial number most likely was on a magnification chart, which is now missing. The microscope comes equipped with two Seibert objectives marked III and 0 that are stored in a leather covered box, three eyepieces (one lacking its lenses made that way for use of the instrument, without optics, as a simple polarizing apparatus), and for conventional microscopy, an aperture stop holder with three stops. The microscope features a substage polarizing condenser with a removable top element (stored in the leather box when not in use) that is focused using a lever mechanism, a rotatable analyzing prism with graduations that mounts above the various eyepieces, and a centerable rotating stage calibrated in degrees. Another, more elaborate, Seibert petrological microscope of similar vintage is also represented in this collection. A similar model of the same vintage, but lacking a rack and pinion adjustment, was also produced by the firm.


On the upper portion of the tube is an inventory label from the Iowa State Teachers College. This college was founded in 1876 as the Iowa State Normal School. It was renamed the Iowa State Teachers College in 1909. It is now known as the University of Northern Iowa. This microscope was obtained from the estate of Dixon L. Riggs who was a Professor of Human Anatomy at the University of Northern Iowa until his retirement in about 1980. It is reasonable to assume that Dr. Riggs collected this old relic from the earlier years of the institution.

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