J. Swift & Son, London, #14790

The Advanced Student's Petrological Microscope, c. 1908

J. Swift & Son, London, #14790. The Advanced Student's Petrological Microscope, c. 1908

J. Swift & Son, London, #14790. The Advanced Student's Petrological Microscope, c. 1908

J. Swift & Son, London, #14790. The Advanced Student's Petrological Microscope, c. 1908

J. Swift & Son, London, #14790. The Advanced Student's Petrological Microscope, c. 1908

J. Swift & Son, London, #14790. The Advanced Student's Petrological Microscope, c. 1908

J. Swift & Son, London, #14790. The Advanced Student's Petrological Microscope, c. 1908

J. Swift & Son, London, #14790. The Advanced Student's Petrological Microscope, c. 1908. Substage

J. Swift & Son, London, #14790. The Advanced Student's Petrological Microscope, c. 1908. Tube

J. Swift & Son, London, #14790. The Advanced Student's Petrological Microscope, c. 1908. Accessories

Among the accessories are a single eyepiece, a 1-inch and 1/4-inch objective each with canister, a divisible substage condenser, and the polarizing Nicol prism in a rotating calibrated mount. The analyzer prism is within the tube held by a slide-in mounting. The Bertrand lens is accomodated within the tube using a focusing sliding-in mounting.

J. Swift & Son, London, #14790. The Advanced Student's Petrological Microscope

microscope storage case


Extracted from the Journal of the Royal Microscopical Society, 1907

This Microscope has recently been further improved from suggestions of J.S. Flett. The coarse adjustment is by means of patented spiral rack and pinion the slow focusing adjustment by a millimetre screw the milled head of which is divided to read to 1/120 mm The glass covered revolving stage has the edge divided to 360 reading to 5 by means of a vernier The polariser is fitted with divided flange and spring catch to indicate the crossing of the Nicol prisms and is made to throw out of the optic axis when required immediately above the polariser is fitted the convergent system of lenses The analysing prism is fitted in a metal box which slides into the optical tube below this is cut an opening for the introduction of a quartz wedge undulation plate or gypsum plate Above the analysing prism is fitted a Bertrand lens with telescopic adjustment by means of which the interference figures are perfectly shown in thick or thin crystals The tube of the cross webbed eye piece is provided with an opening to allow of the use of a quartz wedge or micrometer.


Within the case is a typed paper label reading: "This Swift petrological microscope number 14790 with accessories in the case belongs to and is the property of Angus Campbell Fraser". It is signed by his son F. J. Fraser with the date January 16, 1965.

Frank Jardine Fraser was born in Wallasey, England on August 8, 1892. He was a geologist living in Ottowa, Canada and was the author of Geology of southern Saskatchewan, (Canada. Geological Survey. Memoir, 176), 1935. His father Angus, the original owner of the microscope, was born in Gairloch, Scotland on June 11, 1844.

The James Swift & Son business timeline.

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