C. Verick, Paris (attributed)

Dissecting-Preparation Microscope, c. 1880

C. Verick, Paris (attributed). Dissecting-Preparation Microscope, c. 1880

C. Verick, Paris (attributed). Dissecting-Preparation Microscope, c. 1880

C. Verick, Paris (attributed). Dissecting-Preparation Microscope, c. 1880

C. Verick, Paris (attributed). Dissecting-Preparation Microscope, c. 1880

The microscope is supplied with three doublet objectives, two dissecting needles, and some blank slides,

While this instrument is unsigned by the maker, this form of dissecting-preparation microscope was designed and produced by the Parisian optician Constant Verick beginning in the 1870's. The mechanisms and movements used on this microscope are reminiscent of those that originally appeared in the earlier Raspail type simple microscope; in this case, the older type has been modified with the incorporation of wooden hand-rests and draws for the lenses and accessories. Production of this model, with some refinements, was continued by Verick's successor and son-in-law, Maurice Stiassnie, well into the early 20th century.


The following was extracted from The Journal of the Royal Microscopical Society, 1880

Verick's Dissecting Microscope. This instrument (Pig. 143) does not differ in a sufficiently marked manner from the usual form (though we have found it to be extremely conveniently arranged) to require it to be noticed here, but a special advantage to which we think attention may be usefully drawn is the mounting of the lenses, which are fixed in a tubular setting of more than ordinary depth and expanded at the top to receive the eye similar, in fact, to a watchmaker's glass. We are not able to say whether this additional depth would in prolonged examinations develop any disadvantages; but so far as we have had the opportunity of judging, it constitutes a specially effective protection to the eye from extraneous light beyond what is obtained in the case of the more ordinary setting.

Verick dissecting microscope


An identical signed example is located at the microscopy collections at the Science Museum , London (inventory number A56361) dated 1870-1880. It is described in the catalog as follows:

"A mahogany baseboard supports two sloping wrist-rests, providing two small drawers below. These contain a hand forceps, two mounted needles, and a cuckoo stage forceps. The drawer on the right is fitted for three lenses. In between the drawers the plane mirror is carried on a ball-joint, with the pillar behind. This contains a triangular bar with rack applied to its rear, worked by a pinion in a housing applied to the top of the pillar. At the top of the bar is a rotatable housing for the lens-arm, which is moved to and fro by a screw. The stage bridges the wrist-rests; it is a brass square containing a glass disc cemented in, and with two clips. This is a neat and functional instrument, which still works well. In the 1885 Verick catalogue, the instrument with three lenses (giving magnifications from 6x to 15x) cost FF60, or FF75 with doublets.

Bought by Crisp from the maker in the 1880s, to be number 243 in his collection. Purchased at Stevens's auction, December 1920; price £1.5s."


A similar microscope, with some refinements, was still sold by M. Stiassnie, Verick's successor, in the early 20th century. The following was extracted from the Stiassnie 1905 catalog:

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