C. Verick, rue de la Parcheminerie, 2, Paris, No. 3036

Verick-Malassez Travelling or Pocket Microscope, c. 1880

(Microscope portatif de voyage)

 

C. Verick, rue de la Parcheminerie, 2, Paris, No. 3036. Verick-Malassez Travelling or Pocket Microscope, c. 1880

C. Verick, rue de la Parcheminerie, 2, Paris, No. 3036. Verick-Malassez Travelling or Pocket Microscope, c. 1880 C. Verick, rue de la Parcheminerie, 2, Paris, No. 3036. Verick-Malassez Travelling or Pocket Microscope, c. 1880 C. Verick, rue de la Parcheminerie, 2, Paris, No. 3036. Verick-Malassez Travelling or Pocket Microscope, c. 1880

C. Verick, rue de la Parcheminerie, 2, Paris, No. 3036. Verick-Malassez Travelling or Pocket Microscope, c. 1880. Stored in the case.

C. Verick, rue de la Parcheminerie, 2, Paris, No. 3036. Verick-Malassez Travelling or Pocket Microscope, c. 1880. In folded configuration.

C. Verick, rue de la Parcheminerie, 2, Paris, No. 3036. Verick-Malassez Travelling or Pocket Microscope, c. 1880erick signature

Extracted from The Journal of the Royal Microscopical Society, 1883

Verick's Travelling or Pocket Microscope

Verick's Travelling or Pocket Microscope. In this instrument (figs 46 and 47) portability is obtained, not only by the usual expedients of reversing the body-tube in its sheath and setting the stage at right angles, but also by making the two legs of the base close together, as in a pair of compasses. It then packs into a box 20 cm. by 10 cm. and 5 cm. deep. The instrument was designed by M. C. Verick, with the co-operation of Dr. L. Malassez.


Constant Verick advertised himself as a “élève spécial de E. Hartnack“ both in the signatures he used for some of his instruments and in his catalogs. By the mid 1870's he established his own firm where a number of different microscope models were produced, among which is the portable model presented herein. In 1882, the firm was succeeded by his son-in-law Maurice Stiassnie.

Dr. Louis Malassez (1842 -1909) was a professor of general anatomy at the Collège de France. He speciallized in the histology of blood and tumors. Part of his obituary ( J. Jolly, Bibliographie Anatomique, vol. XIX, 1909, pp. 296-300) can be translated from the French as follows: "Louis Malassez has just died in Paris, the 22nd of December 1909. His name was known to all those interested in microscopic sciences, of which he was one of the most authorized representatives. Fascinated from an early age with the study of biology, he made, in the beginning of his medical studies, the acquaintance with Ranvier and de Cornil, who recruited him into the small laboratory which they had founded in Paris, rue Christine. Initiated by them to histology, he became their closest collaborator; at the same time, in the hospital of Potain, where he was an intern, and in the laboratory of Cl. Bernard, assiduously attended by him, he started his work on the enumeration of the blood globules. Called, in 1875, by Ranvier, to the management of the laboratory of histology of the École des hautes etudes incorporated in the chair of general anatomy in the Collège de France, he dedicated himself completely to scientific research, dividing his time between his laboratory and the Société de biologie.The main treatises of Malassez concern the histology of the blood and the tumours"  
(I thank Jeroen Meeusen for this translation )

The Lesson of Claude Bernard (1813-78) - Session at the Vivisection Laboratory, 1889

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